Monthly Archives: November 2011

Silly Sally Puppets

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In my last post, I mentioned that I was interested in figuring out a way to use puppets to tell Silly Sally by Audrey Wood.  This book is just pure, silly fun.  There isn’t really a message to it–it’s just funny, and I think the addition of puppets would enhance that.

It turns out that I’m not alone in thinking that this would be a great story for using puppets (I didn’t figure I was!)  See this blog for how one librarian pulled it off!

In my search for how to make puppets for Silly Sally, I came across these printables.  I decided that maybe I could work with them instead of trying to make conventional cloth puppets my first time out.  Here they are!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What you’ll need:

Silly Sally printables (see above)

Scissors

Glue stick

Cardstock

Markers/crayons/colored pencils

Clear contact paper/laminating materials

Round wooden dowels

Clear packing tape

Feather (optional)

What to do:

1.  Cut out the printables.

2.  Glue each piece onto cardstock with glue stick.  (Neddy Buttercup and Silly Sally come in two pieces.  Glue the two pieces together before gluing to cardstock).

3.  Color in with markers.

4.  Cut out with scissors.

**Note:  My pieces were curling up after I cut them out, so I put the smaller ones in the pages of a dictionary and put the larger ones under heavy books.  I left them overnight, and this morning they were flat.

5.  Either laminate using a laminating machine or use clear contact paper.  To use contact paper:  Use the grid on the back of the paper to cut a piece of contact paper big enough for each character.  I found that cutting across, then in half worked for all of the animal characters.  Peel the backing off the paper, then lay it, sticky side up, on a table.  Put the character face down on top of the contact paper and press down firmly.  Peel the back off of the other piece of contact paper and carefully apply it to the back.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Believe me, I have tried many ways of doing this, and I found this to be the easiest.  However, do whatever works best for you.

6.  Once you have laminated all of your pieces, cut around them with scissors.  I left a bit of a border around the edges, to keep the contact paper together and to give it more stability.

7.  Flip each piece over and place the wooden dowel as desired. (I put Silly Sally upside down on the dowel, but all other characters right side up.  I think it would be easy enough to just hold it upside down, though).

8.  Place a long strip of packing tape vertically along the dowel.  Place shorter, supporting strips horizontally along the length of the dowel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s Neddy Buttercup, front and back:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.  Secure a feather to Neddy Buttercup’s “tickling” hand with a small piece of packing tape.

How to use them:

Choose four child volunteers (this would probably work best with older children–say, ages 4-7).  Give each of them an animal puppet (pig, dog, loon, sheep) and stand them in a line, in the order they appear in the story.  Keep Silly Sally and Neddy Buttercup.  Start with Silly Sally in right hand and go to each animal.  Dance with Pig, play leapfrog with Dog, sing with Loon, sleep (snore) with Sheep.  Put down Sally and pick up Neddy Buttercup.  Tickle each animal with feather.  Pick Sally up again and have Neddy tickle her.  Have children walk behind you with their puppets upside down to end the story.

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